Wildlife For All is a national campaign to reform state wildlife management to be more ecologically-driven, democratic, and compassionate.

 

  • Ecologically-driven, because that is what is needed to protect species and ecosystems in the face of a global extinction crisis.
  • Democratic, because wildlife is a public trust and everyone should have a voice in wildlife decisions.
  • Compassionate, because wild animals deserve to be treated humanely and with respect.

Wildlife For All is a national campaign to reform state wildlife management to be more ecologically-driven, democratic, and compassionate.

  • Ecologically-driven, because that is what is needed to protect species and ecosystems in the face of a global extinction crisis.
  • Democratic, because wildlife is a public trust and everyone should have a voice in wildlife decisions.
  • Compassionate, because wild animals deserve to be treated humanely and with respect.

Wildlife For All

Wildlife For All is a national campaign to reform state wildlife management to be more ecologically-driven, democratic, and compassionate.

  • Ecologically-driven, because that is what is needed to protect species and ecosystems in the face of a global extinction crisis.
  • Democratic, because wildlife is a public trust and everyone should have a voice in wildlife decisions.
  • Compassionate, because wild animals deserve to be treated humanely and with respect.

 

Why Republicans Turned Against the Environment

Why Republicans Turned Against the Environment

By Paul Krugman

In this op-ed in the New York Times, Paul Krugman argues that the current opposition of Republican politicians to environmental protection is not based on ideology or contributions from polluters, but rather because the environment has become part of a culture war with its roots in issues of race and ethnicity. Although Krugman focuses on climate policy, the same argument could be made about wildlife policy, as described in this excellent article in the New Yorker.

Read more at the New York Times

Let’s Talk Hunting: Part 2

Let’s Talk Hunting: Part 2

By Don Molde

This opinion piece examines the notion of ‘sustainable yield’ versus intrinsic value of wildlife. Don Molde explains the American Wildlife Values survey and the different ways that people view and value wildlife. These values differ widely between the general public and the agencies that manage our wildlife, with agency personnel viewing wildlife “as something akin to property, managed for the sole benefit of humans.” Molde goes on to explore the outdated beliefs that many state wildlife agencies hold, and how these clash with today’s updated scientific understanding and cultural appreciation of wild lives. “Taking action to show the public that non-human lives matter, and that management decisions can be made to reflect the public’s interest, would be a wise move if public support and a broader constituency will be needed to keep the agency viable in the future.” 

Read more at the Sierra Nevada Ally

August 2022 Newsletter

August 2022 Newsletter

From the Desk of the Executive Director: What do Guns have to do with wildlife management, News: The Pittman-Robertson Act, Did You Know: find your state map, This Inspires Us, Our Coalition Partner: Nevada Wildlife Alliance, Spring giving.

Read more

Roadblocks to good wildlife management: beavers could be the answer to flooding and drought issues caused by climate change

Roadblocks to good wildlife management: beavers could be the answer to flooding and drought issues caused by climate change

With climate change transforming the American West, an industrious mammal could help mitigate some of the worst of the coming drought and flooding crises. The West is getting drier in the dry season and more prone to flooding in the wet season. Beavers could well be a relatively low-cost part of resiliency efforts. As natural ecosystem engineers, these largest-of-North-America’s rodents “increase water storage in ponds and surrounding floodplains, thus slowing winter flows, increasing riparian and meadow water availability and extending stream flow up to six weeks into dry summer seasons.”

Read more at Daily Jstor

Looking for the Southwest Environmental Center? You’re in the right place. Read more here.